THE INCIDENCE OF PEDIATRIC EYE INJURIES – BEFORE AND DURING THE SARS-CoV-2 PANDEMIC

  • Daniela Gabriela ANDRONIC “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Nicoleta ANTON “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Irina Andreea NEAGU “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Camelia Margareta BOGDĂNICI “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Abstract

The aim of our study is to evaluate the incidence of the pediatric eye injuries during the non-pandemic and pandemic period and its impact on the patients’ quality of life. Material and methods: The study included children who presented to the emergency department from January 2016 to December 2020. The following data were analyzed: age, sex, place of origin, type of injury therapeutic management, and hospitalization period and expenses. All patients were examined in detail including complete history and ocular examination. Results: 117 patients with eye injuries were enrolled in the study, being examined at the Ophthalmology Clinic of “Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital, Iasi between 2016 and 2020. Of the total study group, 32 children (27.4%) were under 5 noted as Group I, the remaining 85 (72.6%) were between the ages of 5-18, noted as Group II. According to the BETTS classification, an estimated risk for the following types of injury was identified for the age group 5-18 years vs 1-5 years: GD - penetrating 45.9% vs 40.6% and GI - contusion 28.2% vs. 18.8%. Associated systemic / ocular pathologies were significantly more common in the 5-18 age group. Depending on the eye injury, the length of hospital stay was indirectly correlated with visual acuity at discharge. The strongest correlation, although statistically insignificant, was between the length of hospital stay and the type of injury with lamellar laceration. In 69.1% of complex cases, the higher scores of costs were significantly correlated with the high length of hospital stay, and in 35.8% of cases without increased complexity. During the pandemic in 47.7% of complex cases, higher cost values correlated with the high length of hospital stay. In 67.2% of complex cases, the higher scores of costs were significantly correlated with the high length of hospital stay before the pandemic (2016-2019). In over 30% of children, the higher risk score was associated with the higher length of hospital stay. In over 26% of children, higher visual acuity at discharge was associated with a lower risk score. Conclusions: Severe pediatric eye injuries are a major cause of declining quality of life and one of the most common causes of ocular morbidity. Young children are more prone to injuries because of their natural curiosity to explore and their inability to avoid danger.

Author Biographies

Daniela Gabriela ANDRONIC, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Surgery (II)
“Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital, Iasi
Department of Ophthalmology

Nicoleta ANTON, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Surgery (II)
“Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital, Iasi
Department of Ophthalmology

Irina Andreea NEAGU, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Surgery (II)
“Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital, Iasi
Department of Ophthalmology

Camelia Margareta BOGDĂNICI, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

Faculty of Medicine
Department of Surgery (II)
“Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital, Iasi
Department of Ophthalmology

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Published
2021-12-30