ETIOLOGIC SPECTRUM OF POST-OPERATIVE MENINGITIS IN NEUROSURGERY

  • V.D. DOROBAT “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
  • Isabela-Ioana LOGHIN “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi
  • Adriana-Florina BAHNA “Sf. Parascheva” Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iasi, Romania
  • Oana-Manuela SECRIERU “Sf. Parascheva” Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iasi, Romania
  • Raluca-Andreea BUGEAC-ADAMITA “Prof. Dr. N. Oblu” Emergency Clinical Hospital Iasi, Romania
  • L. EVA “Prof. Dr. N. Oblu” Emergency Clinical Hospital Iasi, Romania
  • A. STREINU-CERCEL “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

Abstract

Postoperative meningitis is a rare neurosurgical complication with an incidence of 0.3%-1.5%. The most common pathogen in postoperative meningitis in many studies was Staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus aureus, however recent data reports increasing rates of gram-negative organisms. Material and methods: We performed a retrospective study including 32 patients, diagnosed with post-craniotomy meningitis, who underwent neurosurgery, hospitalized between 2016 and 2019 in “Sf. Parascheva” Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases from Iasi, in order to evaluate the presence of pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid samples. Results: The most common pathogens were Staphyloccoccus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Acinetobacter speciae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enteroccocus faecalis and Escherichia coli. Antibiotherapy was properly administrated according to the antibiogram. Conclusions: Early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment and an interdisciplinary approach can lead to a favorable outcome.

Author Biographies

V.D. DOROBAT, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

Emergency University Hospital Bucharest, Romania

Isabela-Ioana LOGHIN, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi

“Sf. Parascheva” Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iasi, Romania

A. STREINU-CERCEL, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

“Matei Balș” National Institute of Infectious Diseases Bucharest, Romania

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Published
2022-06-30
Section
INTERNAL MEDICINE - PEDIATRICS