HYPOGLYCEMIA INDUCED BY ANTIDIABETIC SULFONYLUREAS

  • Luminita CONFEDERAT University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi
  • Sandra CONSTANTIN University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi
  • Florentina LUPASCU University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi
  • Andreea PANZARIU University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi
  • Monica HANCIANU University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi
  • Lenuta PROFIRE University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem due to its increasing prevalence and life-threatening complications. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas represent the first-line drugs in type 2 diabetes even though the most common associated risk is pharmacologically-induced hypoglycemia. In the development of this side effect are involved several factors including the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the drug, patient age and behavior, hepatic or renal dysfunctions, or other drugs associated with a high risk of interactions. If all these are controlled, the risk-benefit balance can be equal to other oral antidiabetic drugs.

Author Biographies

Luminita CONFEDERAT, University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

Sandra CONSTANTIN, University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

Florentina LUPASCU, University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

Andreea PANZARIU, University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

Monica HANCIANU, University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences II

Lenuta PROFIRE, University of Medicine and Pharmacy”Grigore T. Popa”– Iaşi

Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

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Published
2015-06-30